Control ESPcopter With Processing

After the Getting Started With Processing phase, You can control ESPcopter with Processing, First of All, you need to install there library to Processing which is

1-) controlP5

2-) game control plus

3-)opencv

To code please contact with espcopter@gmail.com

How to Add Library:

 

 

 

How to Connect ESPcopter

Click to Connect

Start to Program

İf you have no gamepad. Return to false from İfconsol = True;

İf you have a Gamepad you need to do the some setting 

First select your gamepad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Getting Started With Processing

Getting Started

Welcome to Processing! Start by visiting http://processing.org/download and selecting the Mac, Windows, or Linux version, depending on what machine you have. Installation on each machine is straightforward:

  • On Windows, you’ll have a .zip file. Double-click it, and drag the folder inside to a location on your hard disk. It could be Program Files or simply the desktop, but the important thing is for the processing folder to be pulled out of that .zip file. Then double-click processing.exe to start.
  • The Mac OS X version is also a .zip file. Double-click it and drag the Processing icon to the Applications folder. If you’re using someone else’s machine and can’t modify the Applications folder, just drag the application to the desktop. Then double-click the Processing icon to start.
  • The Linux version is a .tar.gz file, which should be familiar to most Linux users. Download the file to your home directory, then open a terminal window, and type:
    tar xvfz processing-xxxx.tgz
    (Replace xxxx with the rest of the file’s name, which is the version number.) This will create a folder named processing-2.0 or something similar. Then change to that directory:
    cd processing-xxxx
    and run it:
    ./processing

With any luck, the main Processing window will now be visible. Everyone’s setup is different, so if the program didn’t start, or you’re otherwise stuck, visit the troubleshooting page for possible solutions.

PDE
The Processing Development Environment.

Your First Program

You’re now running the Processing Development Environment (or PDE). There’s not much to it; the large area is the Text Editor, and there’s a row of buttons across the top; this is the toolbar. Below the editor is the Message Area, and below that is the Console. The Message Area is used for one line messages, and the Console is used for more technical details.

In the editor, type the following:

ellipse(50, 50, 80, 80);

This line of code means “draw an ellipse, with the center 50 pixels over from the left and 50 pixels down from the top, with a width and height of 80 pixels.” Click the Run button the (triangle button in the Toolbar).

If you’ve typed everything correctly, you’ll see a circle on your screen. If you didn’t type it correctly, the Message Area will turn red and complain about an error. If this happens, make sure that you’ve copied the example code exactly: the numbers should be contained within parentheses and have commas between each of them, and the line should end with a semicolon.

One of the most difficult things about getting started with programming is that you have to be very specific about the syntax. The Processing software isn’t always smart enough to know what you mean, and can be quite fussy about the placement of punctuation. You’ll get used to it with a little practice.

Next, we’ll skip ahead to a sketch that’s a little more exciting. Delete the text from the last example, and try this:

void setup() {
  size(480, 120);
}

void draw() {
  if (mousePressed) {
    fill(0);
  } else {
    fill(255);
  }
  ellipse(mouseX, mouseY, 80, 80);
}

This program creates a window that is 480 pixels wide and 120 pixels high, and then starts drawing white circles at the position of the mouse. When a mouse button is pressed, the circle color changes to black. We’ll explain more about the elements of this program in detail later. For now, run the code, move the mouse, and click to see what it does. While the sketch is running, the Run button will change to a square “stop” icon, which you can click to halt the sketch.


Getting Started with Blynk

IN ORDER TO USE BLYNK APP YOU WOULD NEED:

  • Hardware that works with Blynk. Check the full list of supported hardware here
  • If your hardware doesn’t have connectivity on board, you can use shields like Ethernet, WiFi, GPRS and many others. Blynk also works over Bluetooth and USB (☝️ USB is not for newbies!)

 

1. DOWNLOAD BLYNK APP FOR ANDROID OR IOS

2. GET THE AUTH TOKEN

In order to connect Blynk App and your hardware, you need an Auth Token.

  1. Create a new account in Blynk App.
  2. Create a New Project. Then choose the board and connection you will use.
  3. After the project was created, we will send you Auth Token over email.
  4. Check your email inbox and find the Auth Token.

 

3. INSTALL BLYNK LIBRARY

☝️ Blynk library should be installed manually. Follow the instructions:

  1. Download the latest release .zip file.
  2. Unzip it. You will notice that archive contains several folders and several libraries.
  3. Copy all these libraries to your_sketchbook_folder of Arduino IDE. To find the location of your_sketchbook_folder, go to top menu in Arduino IDE: File -> Preferences (if you are using Mac OS – go to Arduino → Preferences)

The structure of your your_sketchbook_folder should now look like this, along with your other sketches (if you have them):

your_sketchbook_folder/libraries/Blynk
your_sketchbook_folder/libraries/BlynkESP8266_Lib
...
your_sketchbook_folder/tools/BlynkUpdater
your_sketchbook_folder/tools/BlynkUsbScript
...

☝️ Note that libraries should go to libraries and tools to tools

 

3. CREATE YOUR FIRST EXAMPLE SKETCH CODE

Blynk works with hundreds of hardware models and connection types. We prepared Blynk Examples Sketch Builder that allows you to create example code for your hardware.

OPEN BLYNK SKETCH CODE BUILDER
  1. Choose Your board (for example: Arduino UNO)
  2. Choose your connection (WiFi, Ethernet, Bluetooth, USB…)

 

The first example you need is:

GettingStarted/BlynkBlink

 

4. PASTE THE AUTH TOKEN

• In the example sketch, find this line:

char auth[] = "YourAuthToken";

 

• Change it with your Auth Token (it should be in your email inbox after you created the Project in the Blynk app. Now it should exactly like this (☝️ don’t forget the ” “):

char auth[] = "53e4da8793764b6197fc44a673ce4e21";

• 🔥 Flash the code to your hardware

• Open serial monitor in Arduino IDE. You should see something like this

     ___  __          __
    / _ )/ /_ _____  / /__
   / _  / / // / _ \/  '_/
  /____/_/\_, /_//_/_/\_\
         /___/    v0.4.4

    [1240] Connecting to YourWiFi
    [1240] Connected to YourWiFi
    [1240] My IP: 192.168.10.172
    [1240] Blynk v0.4.4
    [5001] Connecting to blynk-cloud.com:8442
    [5329] Ready (ping: 1ms)

 

Congrats! You are connected! 🎉


Uploading Code

Installing Arduino IDE

This tutorial will walk you through downloading, installing, and testing the Arduino software (also known as the Arduino IDE – short for Integrated Development Environment). Before you jump to the page for your operating system, make sure you’ve got all the right equipment.

What you will need:

  • A computer (Windows, Mac, or Linux)
  • An ESPcopter
  • A USB – micro USB

 

micro usb ile ilgili görsel sonucu

 

Launch and Blink!

After following the appropriate steps for your software install, we are now ready to test your first program with your Arduino board!

  • Launch the Arduino application
  • If you disconnected your board, plug it back in

Lesson 1. Blink
  • Select the type of ESP8266 you’re using: Tools > Board > your board type

 

 

  • Select the serial/COM port that your Arduino is attached to: Tools > Port > COMxx

 

alt text

  • If you’re not sure which serial device is your Arduino, take a look at the available ports, then unplug your Arduino and look again. The one that disappeared is your Arduino.
  • With your Arduino board connected, and the Blink sketch open, press the ‘Upload’ button

alt text

  • After a second, you should see some LEDs flashing on your Arduino, followed by the message ‘Done Uploading’ in the status bar of the Blink sketch.
  • If everything worked, the onboard LED on your Arduino should now be blinking! You just programmed your first ESPcopter!

Installing ARDUİNO

Installing Arduino

Get the latest version from the download page. You can choose between the Installer (.exe) and the Zip packages. We suggest you use the first one that installs directly everything you need to use the Arduino Software (IDE), including the drivers. With the Zip package you need to install the drivers manually. The Zip file is also useful if you want to create aportable installation.

When the download finishes, proceed with the installation and please allow the driver installation process when you get a warning from the operating system.

Choose the components to install

Choose the installation directory (we suggest to keep the default one)

The process will extract and install all the required files to execute properly the Arduino Software (IDE)

Installing the ESP8266 Arduino Addon

There are a variety of development environments that can be equipped to program the ESP8266. You can go with a simple Notepad/gcc setup, or fine-tune an Eclipse environment, use a virtual machine provided by Espressif, or come up with something of your own.

Fortunately, the amazing ESP8266 community recently took the IDE selection a step further by creating an Arduino addon. If you’re just getting started programming the ESP8266, this is the environment we recommend beginning with, and the one we’ll document in this tutorial.

This ESP8266 addon for Arduino is based on the amazing work by Ivan Grokhotkov and the rest of the ESP8266 community. Check out the ESP8266 Arduino GitHub repository for more information.

Installing the Addon With the Arduino Boards Manager

With the release of Arduino 1.6.4, adding third party boards to the Arduino IDE is easily achieved through the new board manager. If you’re running an older version of Arduino (1.6.3 or earlier), we recommend upgrading now. As always, you can download the latest version of Arduino from arduino.cc.

To begin, we’ll need to update the board manager with a custom URL. Open up Arduino, then go to the Preferences (FilePreferences). Then, towards the bottom of the window, copy this URL into the “Additional Board Manager URLs” text box:

http://arduino.esp8266.com/stable/package_esp8266com_index.json

If you already have a URL in there, and want to keep it, you can separate multiple URLs by placing a comma between them. (Arduino 1.6.5 added an expanded text box, separate links in here by line.)

Adding Board Manager URL to Arduino preferences

Hit OK. Then navigate to the Board Manager by going to Tools > Boards > Boards Manager. There should be a couple new entries in addition to the standard Arduino boards. Look for esp8266. Click on that entry, then select Install.

Installing additional boards from Board Manager

The board definitions and tools for the ESP8266 Thing include a whole new set of gcc, g++, and other reasonably large, compiled binaries, so it may take a few minutes to download and install (the archived file is ~110MB). Once the installation has completed, an Arduino-blue “INSTALLED” will appear next to the entry.

Selecting the ESP8266 Thing Board

With the Board addon installed, all that’s left to do is select “ESP8266 Thing” from the Tools > Boards menu.

then select your FTDI’s port number under the Tools > Port menu.


ESPcopter Overview

Espcopter it is unique small size mini drone that is a wirelessly networkable, interactive and programmable drone and what’s more Espcopter is suitable for IoT applications you can develop whatever you want to make. it exclusively produced for students, teachers, makers, engineers briefly people who want to learn how to fly a drone. If you are one of these people, there is no the better time to start.

 

 

PİNOUT

 

 

Switch Positions

Switch OFF

When the switch is off and USB cable plugged, ESPcopter will charge its battery. The following picture shows, LED inductors

     Changing(RED LED)                                                  Full Change(GREEN LED) 

 

Switch ON

When the switch is off, ESPcopter will not charge itself. But the computer will recognize the ESPcopter like a COM port.